(image credit: Jaelle Matthieu)

The building of Monadnock upped the style and quality of living at SNHU in many ways. The bathrooms have two sinks, the toilet and shower are in two different rooms and the windows let in sunlight that would brighten anyone’s day.

Now, I will be clear and be quite upfront: I don’t actually live in Monadnock. I have never lived in a building on campus that was built any time after 1970. So I do not know the ins and outs of Monadnock and I will never claim to. But what I WILL say, is that the automatic lights in the living rooms will haunt me for the rest of my on-campus, sleeping at a friend’s days.

Imagine this.

You have just spent an incredibly long evening studying with a friend, being diligent scholars, and it’s gotten very chilly as the night has grown old. Maybe you wore shorts because it was 60 degrees earlier and you were catching some rays hucking some friz with your pals.

But now it’s late. And cold. And it is a long walk back to your apartment down in the Townhouses. Your friend, out of the kindness of their heart, offers you some space on their couch or air mattress in the corner of their living room. How kind!

You snuggle down and tuck yourself in. You pat yourself on the back for doing homework and for choosing such nice friends with cushy Monadnock apartments. You close your eyes as you drift off to dreamland.

Until the lights come back on. In the middle of the night.

Now, being from the Townhouses, I’m used to things being haunted. Lights flickering and weird noises don’t tend to bother me. But in Monadnock? It’s way too early for that place to be haunted.

So I get up, turn off the lights, go back to sleep….

And wake up an hour later the next time I roll over to the lights back on, me turning them off and the cycle continues.

Now living there, I’m sure it’s nice to wake up and wander into your living room to lights that turn on and greet you. Maybe. All I can say as a frequent guest, it’s the worst. If you live in Monadnock and you respect your couch-crashing friends, invest in some painter’s tape to cover the motion sensors.

Megan Palmer
Megan is an alumna of SNHU, formally the Editor-in-Chief of the Penmen Press. She was an English Language and Literature major with minors in communication and education, and she dedicated herself to the growth and success of SNHU's student-led newspaper. In addition to the Penmen Press, Megan also worked in the Deborah L. Coffin's Women Center, conducted extended research projects with SNHU's club for undergraduate research, and sang with her barbershop chorus.