This article is part of The Penmen Press’s annual April Fool’s edition. Even journalists need to have fun once in a while…

Creating classes that students will be interested in taking can present a challenge to any university. The ques­tion always arises about how to make General Education more appealing or how to increase enrollment in classes. There is the constant struggle for all universities to engage their students and make the college experience as meaningful as possible.

As a result, there has been a rising number of specialty courses offered at Southern New Hampshire University (SNHU). In the past, these classes have included everything from “Breaking Bad” to Fantasy Workshop.

This pattern is going to be one that is continued as SNHU reaches out to its students’ wide array of interests and concentrations. Discussion com­menced in the fall semester of 2015 regarding what could be added to the course lists.

Suggestions for classes included everything from “Comic Books” to “History of SNHU” to “How to Do My Taxes (Please Somebody Help Me With This).” After much consider­ation and deliberation, the decision has been made to add a course.

With the course number FRY101, the course be titled “Can I Fry That?” as an introductory course into the world of frying. It is important to note that this is not just a class for culinary majors, but is an open door for anyone interested in the topic. The class will be conducted in primarily discussion for­mat with students encouraged to ask the hard hitting questions.

Apples, bananas, soccer balls, nothing is off limits to the question, “Can I Fry That?” Students will be shocked to find out the answers. Ask at your own risk.

There is also discussion about adding an experiential component to this course, including field trips to see the world of frying and in class dem­onstrations and tests. Students will be given the opportunity to prove their hypotheses about frying by testing it out themselves!

This course is not for the faint of heart, and SNHU welcomes it as a new and exciting course to be added to the Academic Catalogues. SNHU stu­dents are going to find out if they can really fry that.

Megan Palmer
Megan is an alumna of SNHU, formally the Editor-in-Chief of the Penmen Press. She was an English Language and Literature major with minors in communication and education, and she dedicated herself to the growth and success of SNHU's student-led newspaper. In addition to the Penmen Press, Megan also worked in the Deborah L. Coffin's Women Center, conducted extended research projects with SNHU's club for undergraduate research, and sang with her barbershop chorus.

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