Born in Waterloo, Canada, Hannah Rose, the freshman goalkeeper of the women’s soccer team, has had immense success on and off the soccer field. She has started in all 20 games and has led the team to a 14-4-2 record.

Many people may wonder how she has been so successful, especially at such an early point in her collegiate career. Well, it’s simple. She has the drive, passion and determination to be the best she can be.

Rose lived in Canada until she entered eighth grade. From there, she moved to the United States. She lived in Florida to attend IMG Academy, a boarding school, until she graduated high school earlier this year. When she was looking for colleges, SNHU Assistant Coach Jamie Williams traveled to Florida to watch her play. He liked what he saw so he reached out to her. She later came up to New Hampshire to look at the school and she “absolutely loved it.”

Rose is a communication major and has recently applied to be an International Student Ambassador. She is also taking on a minor in political science.

Rose began playing soccer when she was just three years old. “It was this little rec league, and it was terrible,” she said, “but in my town in Canada, every little kid plays soccer in the summer, and we played hockey in the winter.”

Rose said that soccer has helped to introduce her to people who have shaped her life and changed her as a person.

A challenge Rose faced in her soccer career occurred during her senior season in high school. She broke the fifth metatarsal bone in her foot, which requires surgery to heal. Rose was out for about five months which hindered her ability to play, not only for the remainder of her senior year, but also for preseason preparation here at SNHU.

A large part of why Rose keeps up with soccer is due to her coaches, who have become like parents to her. Her team has also been important to her and considers them her family.

When asked if she felt if there was any pressure on her to perform, especially as a freshman, Rose said the only pressure present is the pressure she puts on herself.

“I always want to succeed; I’m overly competitive. I want to win, regardless of where I’m at. But mostly, I want to win for my teammates.”

Additionally, her teammates hold a special place in her heart and act like her family away from home. “It was like I was already part of the family before I came here; my teammates are so supportive and so awesome. I don’t know what I would be doing if I didn’t have them,” Rose said. “Everything I feel is about helping the team succeed.”

Training for Rose involves a lot of mental preparation and watching game film. “I treat every practice like it’s a game, I work really hard.” She also noted that part of mental preparation is visualization and thinking about what the other team will do next.

“It’s just staying calm and focusing on the game right then and there.”

Rose also said that staying focused involves not letting homework and other thoughts enter her mind while out on the field; she manages her time well outside of the gates to the field.

Attending boarding school helped Rose with her time management. She noted that the schedule of her boarding school was very similar to how her schedule is now.

Being a goalkeeper, Rose feels as though she has a different game to play. “Even though it is a team sport, the goalkeeper position is very much a singular position. It’s a lot of pressure on you; there’s a demand for perfection every time.”

Rose’s experience as a goalkeeper is part of her success; she has learned to master the art of focusing on the field. When asked if she would want to play a different position, Rose said she has always been naturally gifted at being a goalkeeper.

“I’ve always had an infatuation with the goal for some reason, whether it’s defending it or trying to score.”

Rose also noted the importance of her family in her life. “My family has supported me through everything and all my decisions. They sacrifice for me, and I want to make sure I repay them in whatever way I can.” Rose’s inspiration comes from all her teammates, her coaches and famous soccer players such as Ashlyn Harris and Steph Houghton.

In the next four years, Rose hopes to see conference championships and national championships. “Overall, just to be successful. Try to be top of the league, and kick butt.”